Interview: Guest Lecturer Fran Wilde

Fran_Wilde_KyleCassidy
Photo credit: Kyle Cassidy

Award-winning author Fran Wilde will be a guest lecturer at this summer’s Odyssey Writing Workshop. Her novels and short stories have been finalists for three Nebula awards, two Hugo Awards, and a World Fantasy Award. They include her Andre Norton- and Compton Crook-winning debut novel, Updraft (Tor, 2015); its sequels, Cloudbound (2016) and Horizon (2017); the middle-grade novel Riverland (Abrams, 2019); and the novelette “The Jewel and Her Lapidary” (Tor.com, 2016). Her short stories appear in Asimov’sTor.comBeneath Ceaseless SkiesShimmerNature, and the 2017 Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror. She writes for publications such as The Washington PostTor.comClarkesworldio9.com, and GeekMom.com. She holds an MFA in poetry and an MA in information architecture and interaction design. You can find her on TwitterFacebook, and at franwilde.net.


Once you started writing seriously, how long did it take you to sell your first piece? What were you doing wrong in your writing in those early days?

For me, writing seriously began when I started finishing stories. I’d always written. But I often didn’t complete the story drafts because something didn’t “feel” right or sound good enough. So of course because I didn’t finish a story, I had nothing to revise! Which made it really hard to sell things. Once I started finishing stories—writing them to completion, setting them aside for a few days, and then coming back and working on revision before deciding that they weren’t what I wanted—I started selling.  Continue reading “Interview: Guest Lecturer Fran Wilde”

Advertisements

Graduate Essay: Travis Heermann–Crowdfunding for Authors

Heermann-6Freelance writer, novelist, award-winning screenwriter, editor, poker player, poet, and biker, Travis Heermann is a 2009 graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop and the author of Death Wind, The Ronin Trilogy (which begins with Heart of the Ronin), The Wild Boys, and Rogues of the Black Fury, plus short fiction pieces in anthologies and magazines such as Apex Magazine, Alembical, the Fiction River anthology series, Historical Lovecraft, and Cemetery Dance’s Shivers VII.  As a freelancer, he has produced a metric ton of role-playing game work both in print and online for properties including the Firefly Roleplaying Game, Battletech, Legend of Five Rings, d20 System, and EVE Online.

He enjoys cycling, martial arts, torturing young minds with otherworldly ideas, and zombies. He has three long-cherished dreams: a produced screenplay, a NYT best-seller, and a seat in the World Series of Poker.

In 2016, he returned to the U.S. after living in New Zealand for a year with his family, toting more Middle Earth souvenirs and photos than is reasonable.


If you haven’t heard of the crowdfunding sites Kickstarter or Indiegogo, you may be living under an Internet-free rock (for which I would blame no one nowadays). Crowdfunding is the idea that a crowd of people, each contributing just a little bit, can pay the costs to bring a creative project to life. It’s been an exciting new way for filmmakers, graphic artists, game designers, and oh yes, authors, to make their visions become reality—but it’s not without its potential pitfalls.

This article is intended to provide an outline of how crowdfunding works, plus the pros and cons of crowdfunding projects so that you can decide whether it’s right for you. Continue reading “Graduate Essay: Travis Heermann–Crowdfunding for Authors”