Graduate Essay: Travis Heermann–Crowdfunding for Authors

Heermann-6Freelance writer, novelist, award-winning screenwriter, editor, poker player, poet, and biker, Travis Heermann is a 2009 graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop and the author of Death Wind, The Ronin Trilogy (which begins with Heart of the Ronin), The Wild Boys, and Rogues of the Black Fury, plus short fiction pieces in anthologies and magazines such as Apex Magazine, Alembical, the Fiction River anthology series, Historical Lovecraft, and Cemetery Dance’s Shivers VII.  As a freelancer, he has produced a metric ton of role-playing game work both in print and online for properties including the Firefly Roleplaying Game, Battletech, Legend of Five Rings, d20 System, and EVE Online.

He enjoys cycling, martial arts, torturing young minds with otherworldly ideas, and zombies. He has three long-cherished dreams: a produced screenplay, a NYT best-seller, and a seat in the World Series of Poker.

In 2016, he returned to the U.S. after living in New Zealand for a year with his family, toting more Middle Earth souvenirs and photos than is reasonable.


If you haven’t heard of the crowdfunding sites Kickstarter or Indiegogo, you may be living under an Internet-free rock (for which I would blame no one nowadays). Crowdfunding is the idea that a crowd of people, each contributing just a little bit, can pay the costs to bring a creative project to life. It’s been an exciting new way for filmmakers, graphic artists, game designers, and oh yes, authors, to make their visions become reality—but it’s not without its potential pitfalls.

This article is intended to provide an outline of how crowdfunding works, plus the pros and cons of crowdfunding projects so that you can decide whether it’s right for you. Continue reading “Graduate Essay: Travis Heermann–Crowdfunding for Authors”

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Graduate Essay: J.W. Alden–Submitting Short Fiction to Professional Markets

J.W.Alden_8x10_300dpi_3J.W. Alden is fascinated with the fantastic. He lives near West Palm Beach, Florida with his wife Allison, who doesn’t mind the odd assortment of musical instruments and medieval weaponry that decorate his office (as long as he brandishes the former more often than the latter).

Alden is a 1st Place Writers of the Future winner, an active member of SFWA, and a graduate of the 2013 class of the Odyssey Writing Workshop. His fiction has appeared in Nature, Daily Science Fiction, the Unidentified Funny Objects anthology series, and various other publications.

Read more from him at http://www.AuthorAlden.com.


When you’re just starting, the prospect of selling fiction can be an exciting goal. There’s nothing more validating than an editor paying you actual money for your work. But there’s a question every new author faces when they start submitting stories for publication: to pro or not to pro? The road to publication is paved with rejections, and the bigger the market, the thicker the competition. But that doesn’t mean you should sell yourself short! If you’ve written a story you feel is ready for publication, that means your amateur days are behind you. It’s time to turn pro.

 

Don’t Self-Reject–Start at the Top

You’ll never make a sale if you don’t submit. Selling to the pros (or anywhere else) starts first and foremost with having the guts to send your story out into the wild. And that’s easier said than done! It’s no small feat to take something you’ve labored over, a piece of yourself, and send it off to be judged by strangers. If you think about that too hard, you might find yourself coming up with excuses to keep it tucked away, out of the light. The more prestigious the market, the greater that temptation can become. Continue reading “Graduate Essay: J.W. Alden–Submitting Short Fiction to Professional Markets”