Odyssey Workshop

Guest Post: David B. Coe, Rejections and The Aspiring Writer

DavidBCoeDBJacksonPubPic500David B. Coe/D.B. Jackson is the award-winning author of nineteen fantasy novels. He taught “Point of View: The Intersection of Character and Plot” for Odyssey Online in 2016. 

As David B. Coe, he writes The Case Files of Justis Fearsson, a contemporary urban fantasy from Baen Books. The first two volumes, Spell Blind and His Father’s Eyes, are out from Baen Books. The third book in the series, Shadow’s Blade, will be released on May 3, 2016.

Under the name D.B. Jackson, he writes the Thieftaker Chronicles, a historical urban fantasy from Tor Books that includes Thieftaker, Thieves’ Quarry, A Plunder of Souls, and, the newest volume, Dead Man’s Reach.

He lives on the Cumberland Plateau with his wife and two daughters. They’re all smarter and prettier than he is, but they keep him around because he makes a mean vegetarian fajita. When he’s not writing he likes to hike, play guitar, and stalk the perfect image with his camera. Visit David at the following sites:

http://www.DavidBCoe.com
http://www.davidbcoe.com/blog/
http://www.dbjackson-author.com
http://www.facebook.com/david.b.coe
http://twitter.com/DavidBCoe
https://www.amazon.com/author/davidbcoe


Let’s start with the obvious: Rejections suck. Read more…

Special Announcement: Writing Resources

OdboatThank you to all who have applied to the summer Odyssey Writing Workshop!  The deadline for the 2016 June-July Workshop has now passed. Applicants should receive word by May 1.

Writers, there is a variety of free writing resources available on the Odyssey Workshop site. Here are just a few:

–Salon (noun): 1. a place of business that specializes in beauty techniques and products  2. the room in a large house used for the reception and entertainment of guests 3. a gathering of writers, artists, and creative thinkers.

Director Jeanne Cavelos hosts an online writing salon every second Wednesday, from 7.30-8.30 Eastern time (the next one is this Wednesday, April 13). Check out more information, as well as the technical requirements, here, and make plans to join other writers and readers in an online discussion. No experience necessary other than a love for writing and a desire to discuss the craft.

–Manuscript Formatting: Do you need to know about spacing, indents, best fonts, and overall manuscript preparation? See the FAQs of manuscript presentation.

–Literary Agents: Go here for advice about starting your agent search.

Other free offerings: writing exercises and almost one hundred podcasts of authors’ and editors’ lectures from the Workshops, on a variety of subjects from plotting to worldbuilding to submitting and much more.

Stay tuned for notifications about online courses and webinars!

And above all–keep writing.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Summer Workshop Dates & Application Deadline

OdboatcleanedupDon’t let more time slip by.  Make 2016 the year that you take your writing to the next level!

The Odyssey Writing Workshop is one of the top programs in the world for writers of fantasy, science fiction, and horror.  Since its inception in 1996, the Odyssey Writing Workshop has become one of the most highly respected workshops for writers of fantasy, science fiction, and horror in the world.  The intensive, six-week workshop is held on the campus of Saint Anselm College in Manchester, NH, and combines writing, critiquing, in-depth feedback on students’ manuscripts, private conferences, and an advanced curriculum covering all the major elements of fiction writing.  Students commonly describe it as inspiring and transformative

Fifty-nine percent of graduates go on to professional publication, and among Odyssey graduates are best sellers and award winners.  Odyssey is for serious writers ready to give up their lives for six weeks and focus solely on their writing.  You’ll work harder than you ever have before and make friendships that will last a lifetime.

The 2016 Odyssey Summer Writing Workshop will take place June 6 through July 15.

Polish up those entrance stories! All applications must be received by April 8, 2016.

The workshop, directed by award-winning author and editor Jeanne Cavelos, combines an intensive, advanced curriculum with in-depth feedback on students’ manuscripts. 

 Top authors, editors and agents have served as guests at Odyssey, ready to lecture, workshop, and give feedback. This year’s guests:

2016 Writer-In-Residence

Mary KowalMary Robinette Kowal is the author of The Glamourist Histories series of fantasy novels. She has received the Campbell Award for Best New Writer, three Hugo awards, and the RT Reviews award for Best Fantasy Novel. Her work has been a finalist for the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards. Stories have appeared in Strange Horizons, Asimov’s, and several Year’s Best anthologies as well as in her collection Scenting the Dark and Other Stories from Subterranean. 

Mary, a professional puppeteer and voice actor, has performed for LazyTown (CBS), the Center for Puppetry Arts, Jim Henson Pictures, and founded Other Hand Productions. Her designs have garnered two UNIMA-USA Citations of Excellence, the highest award an American puppeteer can achieve. She also records fiction for authors such as Kage Baker, Cory Doctorow and John Scalzi. 

Mary lives in Chicago with her husband Rob and over a dozen manual typewriters. Visit maryrobinettekowal.com.

 

Guest Lecturers Read more…

Interview: Guest Lecturer N.K. Jemisin (Part Two of Two)

NK Jemisin

N. K. Jemisin is a Brooklyn author who will be a guest lecturer at this summer’s Odyssey Writing Workshop in Manchester, N.H.  Her short fiction and novels have been multiply nominated for the Hugo and the Nebula, shortlisted for the Crawford and the Tiptree, and have won the Locus Award for Best First Novel. Her speculative works range from fantasy to science fiction to the undefinable; her themes include resistance to oppression, the inseverability of the liminal, and the coolness of Stuff Blowing Up.

She is a member of the Altered Fluid writing group, a graduate of the Viable Paradise writing workshop, and she has been an instructor for the Clarion workshops. In her spare time she is a biker, an adventurer, a gamer, and a counseling psychologist; she is also single-handedly responsible for saving the world from KING OZZYMANDIAS, her obnoxious ginger cat. Her essays, media reviews, and fiction excerpts are available at nkjemisin.com.

Her newest novel, The Fifth Season, came out in August, 2015.


Part One of this interview posted last Sunday, and is available here

What are some elements of your favorite novels or works that influence your work?

My inspiration is usually mythology. I’m more interested in stories as they’ve existed throughout antiquity. I like oral storytelling; I like creation myths of various peoples and cultures and religions. I myself am an agnostic, so I see all religions and all creation myths as mythology, although I know that for a lot of people it’s a lived experience. As far as I am concerned, humanity has had several thousand years to perfect storytelling, and there’s a lot to be learned from those basic, classic—even primordial—storytelling forms and ideologies. That is more interesting to me than what is selling best and what is popular. That may be why I’m not a bestseller! I don’t know. I write stories that excite me; I’m not trying to become the next G.R.R. Martin; I’m trying to tell a story that makes me happy. It’s entirely possible that at some point that writing a story like Martin might make me happy, but right now I’m a little more basic.

My favorite authors tend to be other people who do the same thing. Tanith Lee—I fell in love with her Flat Earth books, way back in the day—and Ursula LeGuin, and other writers like that. I’m a big fan of Storm Constantine, who I think is clearly not interested in what is being done elsewhere in literature; she’s very much doing her own thing. She’s written a number of series and standalones that are just mindblowing. She’s probably best known for a series of six or seven books, called Wraeththu. It’s a fascinating fantasy love story set in a far future Earth in which humankind has mutated into a monogendered species (for lack of a better description). Intersex is the more appropriate term. The characters have both female and male organs; they are capable of reproducing amongst themselves, and they use sex magic to do all kinds of miraculous and horrific stuff. The story is all about several characters in this Wraeththu-verse going forth and doing their thing. It turns out belatedly that the story is a post-apocalyptic fantasy but it takes a while to realize that.

I liked Louise Cooper (rest in peace). I like a lot of the fantasy that you see coming out of other cultures. I’m a giant anime and manga fan. An example of the stuff that I’ve loved that has definitely influenced my work is Rig Veda by CLAMP, the all-female manga group. This type of group is not unusual in Japan; there’s quite a few women writing fantasy there. Manga isn’t nearly as male-dominated there. In Japan it’s pretty easy to find stuff from different perspectives, not just the straight guy. I do like the straight-guy stuff too, especially when it’s coming out of a different culture, simply because it brings different perspectives and really just different ways of thinking about things. Rig Veda is particularly interesting because it is a Japanese manga retelling of an Indian myth. Just imagine the core mythos of any religion, retold in manga form, and that’s what you’ve got. Imagine the story of Jesus retold by Japanese manga artists. Some people might find that blasphemous, but it sure as hell would be interesting—it probably exists out there, too.

We hope you are looking forward to the Odyssey Workshop this summer! As a guest lecturer, you’ll be lecturing, workshopping, and meeting individually with students. What do you think is the most important piece of advice you can give to developing writers?

jemisin 1 kingdom of godsI’m looking forward to the Odyssey Workshop. I always wanted to participate in a six-week workshop, and I always thought Odyssey would be the one, because Odyssey is one of the few workshops willing to accept novel writers, and critique novels. Other workshops only accept short stories—and remember at the time that I was a little snooty toward short stories. I wanted to do Clarion but didn’t have the skills at the time to write short stories.
As for advice, I would say that if you get into a critique group or a workshop, you’ll learn a lot more from watching other people be critiqued than you do from actually getting critiqued yourself. In a lot of cases, people are too close to their own work. It’s hard to hear criticism without having that visceral “You hate my baby!” reaction. “You just said my baby was ugly! I’ve going to kill you!” You’re too busy reacting to really hear what’s being said. But with other people’s work—you’re detached from it because it’s not yours. You’ve read it, you’re thinking about how you interpreting it versus how other people interpret it and that gives you a better sense of what makes a story work.

If you’re using the Milford model critiquing method—the sort of standard workshop critiquing method—you’re also going to hear what the author intended versus what they actually managed to do. That shows you different techniques to use, how effective certain techniques can be or how ineffective they might be. It’s important to remember it’s not about getting about critiqued yourself—that’s important; that helps—but what’s going to teach you the most is watching other people being critiqued. It’s so helpful to listen.

Tell us about your writing schedule—where you like to write, and when. You mention a “business day” in other interviews. Does that have to do with your writing career? Do you have any advice for writers about writing schedules and so forth?

My business day is a thing I’ve had to institute because I’ve become a professional writer. I didn’t have to worry about doing interviews or going to the bank to set up a business account or meeting with my accountant—none of that stuff was an issue before. I do have a full-time day job—my boss and coworkers have been incredibly understanding about me having a secondary career. I work four days a week, ten hours a day, at the day job. Then Fridays I have free, because I needed a day during the week when I could do all these meetings and things like that. That leaves my weekends free for writing.

My writing days include Fridays if I don’t have any business, but it’s rare that I don’t. But on my writing days, I get up around eight, feed the cat. Usually the cat will try to get me up before eight, because he’s annoying—that said, we’ve reached a mutual point of understanding about certain things. I will make breakfast, mess around a little bit, and usually try to keep a nine to five day, because as far as I’m concerned, writing is work.

I do my best writing by day. Different people do different things; some people write at night, but I write by day because that’s how my brain works. I will start writing around nine and try to get in about 1500 words a day. More if I’m in deadline mode, which means 2500-3000 words a day, which is hard on me. But writing at my usual leisurely pace equals about 1500 words a day. And I do the same thing on Sundays. I write till about five p.m. I try to go to the gym afterwards. Exercise is important. But it’s also important to have a life—to have people in your life. To spend time with family and go out with friends and have those experiences.

If I’m on a deadline, I will also write during the week. I come home from work and try to target write a couple of hours before I go to bed—to hit a certain number of words per week so I can stay on track. I don’t like doing that; I’m usually tired after working all day and then come home and do more work, but sometimes it’s necessary. If I can write about 250 words after work I feel like I’ve done something amazing.

What’s next on the writing-related horizon for you?

I have a couple of projects that I’m working on right now. One I can’t actually mention right now; for the first time, I’m doing a media tie-in novel, which I am contractually obligated not to talk about, but I’m doing it, so I can at least acknowledge I AM DOING THE THING. That will be out later this year.

I’m also on Book Three of the Broken Earth trilogy. I’d broken jemisin 2 fifth seasonground on it but I had to put it aside to do the media tie-in. That’s not a bad thing; the Broken Earth books are soul-grinding. The Fifth Season was hard to write. After writing The Fifth Season, I needed a palate cleanser, so I went off and wrote the “Awakened Kingdom” novella (set in the Inheritance trilogy world) which was my attempt at being silly and light-hearted—but even when I’m writing a light-hearted story, I have to change the world in it, and it turned out that after the events in the second Broken Earth book I wanted a palate cleanser there too. I decided to do the media tie in for that. Now I’m raring to go on Book Three. I’m hoping to get that done before August.

I have a short story I wrote last year coming out on Tor.com, but they haven’t given me an ETA on publication for that.

That’s what’s happening right now!

Interview: Guest lecturer N.K. Jemisin (Part One of Two)

NK JemisinN. K. Jemisin is a Brooklyn author who will be a guest lecturer at this summer’s Odyssey Writing Workshop in Manchester, N.H.  Her short fiction and novels have been multiply nominated for the Hugo and the Nebula, shortlisted for the Crawford and the Tiptree, and have won the Locus Award for Best First Novel. Her speculative works range from fantasy to science fiction to the undefinable; her themes include resistance to oppression, the inseverability of the liminal, and the coolness of Stuff Blowing Up.

She is a member of the Altered Fluid writing group, a graduate of the Viable Paradise writing workshop, and she has been an instructor for the Clarion workshops. In her spare time she is a biker, an adventurer, a gamer, and a counseling psychologist; she is also single-handedly responsible for saving the world from KING OZZYMANDIAS, her obnoxious ginger cat. Her essays, media reviews, and fiction excerpts are available at nkjemisin.com.

Her newest novel, The Fifth Season, came out in August, 2015.


From the time you started writing to the time you started writing seriously, how long did it take you to sell your first piece (defined here as short story)? What do you think you were doing wrong in your writing in those early days?

I sold my first short story probably 1-2 years after I seriously started trying to get published in that area. I got serious basically around the age of 30. Unfortunately, I couldn’t afford to go to Odyssey, but I did end up doing a one-week workshop, which was Viable Paradise, but after that I joined a writing group, and our writing group kind of made up the difference there. So that’s how I got a lot of experience and skill writing short stories–having the group tear them apart and then submitting them. The group got me in the habit of submitting stories, and submitting and submitting and submitting until submission was part of being a writer in my head—and rejections were also part of being a writer in my head. So I’d say it took a year to a year and a half, maybe.

As for what I was doing wrong, Read more…

Interview: Graduate and guest lecturer Scott H. Andrews

Photo credit: Al Bogdan

Photo credit: Al Bogdan

Scott H. Andrews, 2005 graduate, will be a guest lecturer at this summer’s Odyssey Writing Workshop.

Scott lives in Virginia with his wife, two cats, nine guitars, a dozen overflowing bookcases, and hundreds of beer bottles from all over the world. His literary short fiction has won a $1000 prize from the Briar Cliff Review, and his genre short fiction has appeared in Ann VanderMeer’s Weird Tales, On Spec, and Space and Time. He is a World Fantasy Award finalist for his work as Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, a Hugo Award finalist fantasy magazine that Locus has called “a premier venue for fantastic fiction, not just online but for all media.”

Visit him online at http://www.scotthandrews.com, on Facebook, or on Twitter @Scott_H_Andrews.


When looking for stories for Hugo-, World Fantasy Award-, and Parsec-nominated magazine Beneath Ceaseless Skies, you look for “stories that focus on the character.” What advice would you give to writers who want to create more well-rounded, fully realized, and interesting characters? Do you think there is a difference between coming up with interesting characters in short stories versus novels?

I think the core thing that every character must have is a motivation. All compelling characters want something. Even if they can’t articulate what they want or don’t know what it is, or even if what they want is an antithetical thing, like wanting to not have a goal.

For characters who are more well-rounded or fully realized, I like a concept I’ve seen attributed to the great SF and literary writer Samuel R. Delany. Characterization often isn’t in the details of the character so much as the contradictions between those details. Imagine a character who’s a stockbroker and drives a luxury sedan. Then imagine a character who’s a stockbroker but drives a beat-up old pickup. That contradiction between those two details immediately adds another dimension to this character. It instantly feels unusual, and thus interesting. It immediately brings questions to mind: why does this stockbroker drive such a car, whereas most stockbrokers don’t and most people who drive such a car are not stockbrokers. I think contradictions are an extremely powerful characterization technique for making characters feel well-rounded and interesting.

To go beyond characters that are merely well-rounded or interesting to ones who resonate with me profoundly, I love the concepts that Faulkner mentioned in his Nobel Prize speech, which George R.R. Martin–who is routinely praised for his characters–often quotes. Faulkner said the only thing worth writing about is “the problems of the human heart in conflict with itself;” the universal truths of “love and honor and pity and pride and compassion and sacrifice.” Things like that for me really cut to the core of what it means to be human. I often find that characters who truly move me, who make me sit there in stunned silence for a moment after I’ve finished a story, are ones who touch on universal facets of human nature like those. So Faulkner’s articulation of them, while for me not by any means a method or checklist, is a good yardstick for elements that can make a character resonate profoundly with me.

I don’t think there’s any innate difference between coming up with characters for short stories versus novels. They all still need a motivation, and for me they still need to be resonant in some way. Both stories and novels have plenty of room for characters to undergo a character change, in a convincing way. I think however there is a big difference in the amount of space that those different lengths allow for the writer to develop that characterization. In a short story, the characterization needs to be clear and concise from the start; there isn’t time for it to slowly accrete through multiple incidents and interactions the way that characterization can build in a novel.

Beneath Ceaseless Skies is a magazine for literary adventure fantasy. What suggestions do you have for genre writers looking to use more literary techniques in their writing? Are there any resources in particular that you recommend?

I think a great resource for genre writers looking to use more literary techniques in their writing is the vast wealth of literary-leaning genre stories published in online magazines. We are in a golden age of literary techniques being used in genre writing, especially in short fiction, and much of that short fiction was published in online ‘zines and is available for free. To find literary-leaning stories, I might recommend starting with pieces that were finalists for major awards; stories that receive notice for awards are often more avant or literary. Another strategy would be to survey magazines that tend to publish literary-leaning stories, like BCS or Clarkesworld, and look for authors who’ve been published there multiple times.

I would also recommend that writers looking to use more literary techniques be adventurous in experimenting with literary techniques or approaches in their stories. Experimentation works great in the smaller form-factor of short fiction, where you can try something unusual or off-the-wall but with a much smaller investment of time and work than a novel.

I also think that readings from bygone high school or college English class are resources worth considering. Much of that material if you’re looking for pleasure reading is pretty dry for most people, me included, but all of that fiction is considered quite moving or profound by a consensus of some experienced readers. If there’s a classic literary author whose work is still in your head years later or who you hear mentioned by genre writers, maybe look up an old piece of theirs that you might have been forced to read back in school and see if it offers you any inspiration or insight now. It might contain something interesting and different that you weren’t experienced enough as a reader or writer back then to notice, or that you haven’t seen in genre works that you’ve read. It might spark you toward something literary-leaning or open your mind to a different direction. Some of those English-class writers of course have solid connections to our genre–Bradbury, Orwell, Huxley–and some genre writers are becoming common in lit courses–Tolkien, Le Guin.

You’ve read quite a number of short stories over the years as an editor. For writers looking to improve their understanding of how short stories work, how would you suggest critically reading stories with an eye to improvement and understanding? Are there particular elements critical readers should look for?

As with all fiction writing, I think that breaking down what an author is doing on the page can be invaluable as a way to gain insight into writing.

One way I like to critically break down a story is to look at it overall. View it as chunks or elements summing to a whole. How was it structured, how did it flow and escalate, how did it reveal information about the world or character. What expectations did it raise, and how or whether it delivered on them. How did it build to a peak, and how did that peak resolve (or choose not to resolve). Did it overall work for you, as a reader, or did it not, and why. Is it similar to what you, as a writer, are trying to do.

Another important way to break down a story for me is to look very closely at the opening. A story’s opening must hook readers and editors, but there are a thousand different ways to achieve that. It must give readers everything they need in order to slip into the story, but it can’t give them so much that it drives them away. One way to break down an opening is to read it extremely slowly, one phrase at a time or even one word at a time, holding a piece of paper over the rest of the words to hide them from your eyes. Then stop after each phrase or word and think about what’s going on. For each word or phrase you read, does it make you want to read on, or not? And why. Is it interesting to you, or not? Are you engaged, and if so, by what? What sort of lures is the author using to make you want to keep reading–such as curiosity, mystery, disquietude, tension, humor? Because that sort of word-by-word analysis is exactly what’s happening in my head when I read the opening of any story. Each word and phrase in that opening is either engaging or luring me somehow or it’s not, and that’s what makes me keep reading. After the first paragraph or so, you can speed up the analysis to one sentence at a time. Are those next couple paragraphs continuing to keep you reading? Are they building things, such as character and world, at an engaging level of increase? How are they doing as far as raising questions and expectations for you as a reader, and escalating or answering questions and expectations that the first paragraph raised?

A more challenging but incisive way to break down a story is to analyze its voice. Voice, for me, is the key factor that sets a story apart and makes it feel unique. How is an author you admire, or a story whose voice affects you, pulling off that voice on the page? What word choices and tone and style are they using to do it? How could you execute that sort of voice, in a way that might work for your characters or story? Voice is ephemeral and more difficult to analyze, but doing that can offer great insight into how great writers achieve it on the page.

Can you talk a little about a story Beneath Ceaseless Skies has recently published, explaining what initially drew you to it and why you bought it for the magazine, and providing a link to the story?  That will allow our readers to compare your reaction to their reactions and perhaps gain some insights.

Last October in our Seventh Anniversary Double-Issue, we published BCS 183 7 Anniv “The Sons of Vincente” by I.L. Heisler, who coincidentally is an Odyssey graduate.  It’s concise yet vivid; a great story to experience as a reader, then analyze more closely.  It’s available at this link, as text and ebook and audio podcast:

http://www.beneath-ceaseless-skies.com/stories/the-sons-of-vincente/

Several things in the opening drew me.  From the very first paragraph, the voice has a great feel to it for me; imposing and intense, slightly poetic but not overly so.  The opening lines have vivid and tactile images, shown very concisely and with a tone of emotion to the details.  That’s important to me, that details are not just details but also are conveying a sense of mood or emotion.

The opening also gets immediately to a situation of character conflict, in the second and third sentences:  the narrator is fleeing, and his mother is assuring him he will be safe.  But we don’t know why or what from, and that makes me curious.  We also don’t know, from his childlike perspective, if his mother is lying or not, and that makes me feel uncertainty.  I want to keep reading to find out.  We also get concise hints of the paranormal world:  the narrator has snakes on his scalp; he must be some sort of Gorgon-like creature.

As the opening continues, the narrator’s situation gets completely upended.  It’s a moment that shapes his motivation for the rest of the story, and it’s portrayed so emotively that it makes me not only understand his motivation but also feel it along with him.  That’s always important to me–I need to not only know or understand a character’s motivation, but I need the story to make me feel it too.  I am moved by what happened to him, so I feel why he is driven to do what he does.

The story overall is intensely character-centered, about this young man working toward what he’s driven to do.  The story never spells out what exactly he wants ultimately to do, but it shows you his intense attitude about what he’s doing, and that attitude makes me feel his motivation for myself even though the story isn’t yet revealing exactly what he wants.

The story is told over a long span of time, which sometimes makes a story feel less acute or immediate to me, but this one zooms in from its time-lapse narrative to include vivid and emotive episodes of character interaction, and those live-action episodes keep things feeling acute for me.  It has details showing this particular society, and details of a craft or trade, in this case stonecarving.  I always want to feel the world that a story is set in, and I always like getting details and jargon of interesting trades.

As the conflict builds, there are threads of escalation that are clear and others that are subtle.  There are strong emotions from the characters, like love, grief, and cruelty.  There is emotional pathos. All the incidents and threads fit together and resonate with each other as the story builds to a climax that ties in the subtle threads and casts a new light over everything that came before.

And all over a rather short length; the story is only 2800 words long. In addition to all the great things it includes, I think it’s also a fine example of a fantasy story with very concise world-building.  Some settings require more story room to show them than others, but this story demonstrates that it’s definitely possible to write secondary-world fantasy short fiction at short lengths.

As a guest lecturer at this summer’s Odyssey Writing Workshop, you’ll be lecturing, workshopping, and meeting individually with students. What do you think is the most important advice you can give to developing writers?

I think the most important advice I can give to developing writers is about being a neo-pro writer or workshop grad, about experiences that many neo-pros or workshop grads will face. I think I’m uniquely qualified to lecture about that because I’ve seen it from both an external perspective and an internal one. I’m a workshop grad neo-pro myself, and I’ve been through many of the experiences that neo-pros and workshop grads encounter. I can speak directly to those thing from an internal, personal perspective. I also am friends with over a hundred such writers from Odyssey and other workshops, and I’ve interacted with probably another thousand neo-pro writers who’ve submitted to BCS. I’ve seen that same neo-pro stage of being a writer also from the outside, a more objective viewpoint, so I can speak to that side of it too. I’ve lived the challenges of being a neo-pro, and I’ve watched a thousand other neo-pros live through them too.

A single and important piece of such advice for developing writers would be this: regardless of whatever studying or instruction or workshops or courses or critique groups you are using to improve your writing, I think it’s important to always make sure to still be yourself. Make sure that your writing still is uniquely yours; make sure you still keep in it whatever unique essence or slant or personality that is you. Writers often ask the question “why do you write.” Another variation on that is “what are you trying to say with your writing.” What do you want your writing to do. I think it’s important, especially when studying or workshopping or critiquing, to not lose sight of the unique personality that your writing has, and what you want it to accomplish. That is the element that sets your writing apart from everyone else’s in the galaxy. That is the thing that will let your writing offer a unique contribution.

What’s next on the writing-related horizon? Are you starting any new projects?

I am trying to write a novel! It’s the third or fourth novel I’ve tried to write in the last five years. I’ve had to tear down and rebuild my process multiple times, but I think I have found one that will work, so I am at the same time trying to write a novel and trying to learn how to write a novel. Hopefully I’m on my way out of Rivendell, not merely still stuck in The Shire.:)

Special Announcement: Final Odyssey Online Course Deadline +New Podcasts

OdboatThank you to all those who have registered for the winter online writing classes with Jeanne Cavelos and Barbara Ashford!

There is still time to register for “Point of View: The Intersection of Character and Plot,” taught by David B. Coe, author of The Thieftaker Chronicles (writing as D.B. Jackson), the LonTobyn Chronicle, a trilogy that was awarded the William L. Crawford Award for best new fantasy series, the Winds of the Forelands series, and the Blood of the Southlands trilogy.

Odyssey Online helps you to learn new techniques and build your skills, and provides in-depth feedback to guide you.  If you’re ready to hear about the weaknesses in your writing and ready to work to overcome them, you’d be welcome to apply.

Point of View: The Intersection of Character and Plot

Course Meets:  January 21 – February 18, 2016
Instructor:  David B. Coe
Application Deadline:  December 26, 2015
Level:  Beginner/Intermediate

Of all the many tools writers have at their disposal, perhaps none is more powerful, or more overlooked, than point of view. Often thought of simply as the perspective through which a story is told, it is actually far, far more.  It is the mechanism by which we guide our readers through the plot points, narrative arcs, and emotions of our fiction. It is the place where all of our storytelling elements–character, plot, setting, prose–come together. And point of view can also provide solutions to some of the most common problems encountered by aspiring writers and professionals alike. Award-winning author David B. Coe, highly praised mentor and teacher of fiction writing, will show how weaknesses in point of view can undermine an entire story.

We will begin our discussion of point of view by looking at the many factors that go into choosing the correct point of view character or characters for our stories, as well as the proper voice for those characters. We will then move to the study of how point of view influences not only character arc, but also our establishment of plotting, setting, and pacing. We’ll explore the challenges in writing from the point of view of non-human characters and characters from alien cultures. Finally we will conclude the course with an exploration of the ways in which POV can be used to address a host of common problems writers encounter in their work.


Resources abound at the Odyssey Workshop home! Visit the Odyssey Podcasts page for downloadable lectures on a whole variety of writing-related topics. Recent podcasts include:

  • “Making It Real” by E.C. Ambrose (#87 and #88), who discusses the importance of worldbuilding, setting, details, and POV.
  • “Productivity for Writers” by Alex Hughes (#85 and #86).  Alex Hughes shares how to prioritize writing and strategies for focusing on getting words on the page.  Alex will also be leading our first live webinar in February 2016. See the details and register here!
  • “Characterization” by Ellen Kushner and Delia Sherman (#83 and #84). Guest lecturers at the 2014 Summer Workshop, Ellen and Delia talked about writing characters with your own heart and insight, and creating in depth, complex characters.

Special Announcement: Upcoming Winter Online Classes + Webinar

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Start the new year by leveling up your writing skills! 

The Odyssey Writing Workshops Charitable Trust, widely known for its highly praised, six-week, in-person workshop, is offering three intensive online writing classes this winter, as well as Odyssey’s first webinar. 

Odyssey Online helps you to learn new techniques and build your skills, and provides in-depth feedback to guide you.  If you’re ready to hear about the weaknesses in your writing and ready to work to overcome them, you’d be welcome to apply.

The online classes being offered are:

  • Three-Act Structure in Fantastic Fiction, taught by Odyssey director and bestselling author Jeanne Cavelos;
  • Getting the Big Picture: The Key to Revising Your Novel, taught by award-winning author Barbara Ashford; and
  • Point of View: The Intersection of Character and Plot, taught by award-winning author David B. Coe.

Read more…

Interview: Graduate and Guest Lecturer Meagan Spooner

MeaganSpoonerMeagan Spooner, 2009 Odyssey graduate and bestselling author, will be a guest lecturer at the 2016 Odyssey Writing Workshops. Meagan grew up reading and writing every spare moment of the day, while dreaming about life as an archaeologist, a marine biologist, an astronaut. She graduated from Hamilton College in New York with a degree in playwriting, and has spent several years since then living in Australia. She’s traveled with her family all over the world to places like Egypt, South Africa, the Arctic, Greece, Antarctica, and the Galapagos, and there’s a bit of every trip in every story she writes.

She currently lives and writes in Northern Virginia, but the siren call of travel is hard to resist, and there’s no telling how long she’ll stay there. In her spare time she plays guitar, plays video games, plays with her cat, and reads.

Meagan Spooner is the author of the bestselling young adult fantasy Skylark Trilogy (Skylark, Shadowlark and Lark Ascending). She is also, with Amie Kaufman, the co-author of the young adult science fiction Starbound Trilogy (These Broken Stars, This Shattered World and Their Fractured Light, from Disney Hyperion). These Broken Stars won Australia’s Aurealis Award, and the storyline has been optioned for television.

More information about Meg can be found at http://www.meaganspooner.com.


We last interviewed you back in 2012, just as you were launching not one, but two trilogies—Skylark, written by you, and Starbound (which includes the Aurealis Award-winning These Broken Stars), co-written with Amie Kaufman. You’ve been very busy! Catch us up on the last three years.

It’s been crazy. Most of the time I feel like it’s been a decade since that first book, but then I look back and realize it’s only been three years and I end up feeling dizzy. Read more…

Special Announcement: World Fantasy Award Nominations for Jeanne Cavelos and Scott H. Andrews

We here at the Odyssey Blog and pretty much anyone ever associated with Odyssey Writing Workshops are ecstatic! Why?

Because Jeanne Cavelos, the founder and director of the Odyssey Writing Workshops, and Scott H. Andrews, Odyssey graduate and founder and editor of Beneath Ceaseless Skies Magazine, have each been nominated for World Fantasy Awards! The World Fantasy Convention and award ceremony will take place next month in Saratoga Springs, New York–and until then we’re all on the edge of our seats.

Without further ado, we Odfellows present a tribute to Jeanne and Scott.

Ode to Jeanne

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Jeanne Cavelos

Odyssey just concluded its 20th workshop, and its two decades of operation have spawned such writers as Carrie Vaughn, Theodora Goss, James Maxey, Alex Hughes, Rebecca Shelley, Lyn Benedict, Barbara Webb, Mike Grinti, J.A. White, Meagan Spooner, and David J. Schwartz, and editors such as Scott H. Andrews and Douglas Cohen–and many more, and more to come.

Jeanne Cavelos, nominated in the Special Award–Professional division for creating and running the Odyssey Writing Workshops, is one of the most humble, unassuming people I know–all the better to get her sneaky editor claws in you, because she has lived quite the varied life, and she brings all of her experience plus a critical eye toward editing, critiquing, and writing, whether she’s assessing her work or someone else’s. She’s an astrophysicist who worked for NASA, then was a senior editor at Bantam Doubleday Dell where she started an award-winning line of books, and now is a college professor who runs a full-service freelance company on the side. She is the author of several books, both fiction and nonfiction (The Science of the X-Files was nominated for a Bram Stoker Award), and has also edited an anthology. (She swears she has not cloned herself.)

But those are all the jobs she gets paid for.

I can say with all honesty that creating and running Odyssey is the jewel in Jeanne’s crown. I’ve gotten to know her a little over the last eight years and in that time I can’t say her enthusiasm for Odyssey has ever flagged. She works tirelessly to promote and host the annual six-week on-site summer Workshop, and even expanded Odyssey’s offerings to include online winter writing courses and themed free online salons.  There is always something to do and someone to see, and when an Odyssey workshop comes around, plots to fix and characters to revive.

Jeanne lives and breathes Odyssey, at great sacrifice to herself and others. She has made it her life’s work to educate amateur, up-and-coming science fiction, fantasy and horror writers, and introduce us to the world of writing and publishing. The caliber of instruction at Odyssey is always high because Jeanne sets the bar high and makes good on that promise, year after year. If something doesn’t work, she acknowledges it, fixes it, and does better.

In Odyssey, Jeanne has crafted an atmosphere that fosters collaboration and community over competition. Many graduates return year after year for TNEO (The Neverending Odyssey)–ten days of critiquing, story writing and all things science fiction–for more of that same community and support. Most of us stay in contact with each other, encouraging writerly habits.

Jeanne doesn’t do any of this for fame. She is always looking for better ways to serve amateur writers and give us the tools we need to become professional writers. She does it for the students, for all the people she sees who are writers. Whether Jeanne wins an award or not (but hint: we think she should), we thank her for everything that she does for us–and she should know we wouldn’t ask for a better evil overlord.

~Ronya F. McCool (Odyssey 2007) is the managing editor for the Odyssey Workshops Blog. She lives, works, writes and renovates in the Midwest and can sometimes be heard on the Libraryland podcast.~


A Toast to Scott upon the Event of his WFA Nomination

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Scott H. Andrews (photo courtesy of Al Bogdan)

My pal, drinking buddy and fellow 2005 Odfellow Scott H. Andrews is up for a World Fantasy Award! Permit me to briefly bask in the credit of his association and raise a glass of something frothy in his honor as I elucidate why it couldn’t have happened to a better editor.

Scott is a great, meticulous, thoughtful, perceptive, respectful editor. As far as I’m concerned, he’s like nobody else working in the field. If you’ve ever submitted to Beneath Ceaseless Skies, you know how routinely generous he is with his time. He provides actual feedback in practically every rejection. He asks for way more rewrites than is good for him. When he buys a story, all too often it’s because he helped the author make it better. This has certainly been the case with all five of the stories I’ve sold him. He’s made me a better writer.

As a reader, he has an uncanny ability to inhabit a character inhabiting a world that isn’t our own, to see that world through their eyes and feel what they feel. As an editor, that ability helps him keep me honest. Often it seems like he knows my world and my characters better than I do. I’m not saying I’ve never been frustrated working with him–I think every writer loves their own words too much for their own good–but he knows that as well as I do, and he’s always ready to work through it. And the story is better for it. He is the only editor I’ve worked with willing to go to those lengths. In fact, I’d argue no other short fiction editor in the field contributes as much has he does to making the stories they buy as good as they can be.

Contrary to what we’ve heard from different quarters over the past few years, short fiction is not dying. But neither does it pay an editor’s bills; novels do that. In an era when many top markets for short fiction act as loss-leaders for novel sales, BCS is an end in itself. The purview is narrow: character-driven, secondary world adventure fantasy. But that narrow focus allows Scott to be the best at what he does. And in doing so, he’s forged a legitimacy for that kind of fiction without which by now it might have faded away completely. When BCS came on the scene in 2008, Realms of Fantasy was the only professional-rate market dedicated to short fantasy, and it was in its death throes. Eight years later, thanks to Scott, BCS is the top market for fantasy.

I’m really proud of him for the nomination. In fact, I think it’s overdue. But if this year has taught us anything, it’s that there’s no accounting for awards politics. So by way of closing, let me just suggest that in the event he doesn’t win the award (and here let me express profound relief Scott and Jeanne aren’t in the same category), next time you run into him, you should really ask him to recap his acceptance speech.

Here’s to Scott and BCS!

 

~Michael J. DeLuca’s (Odyssey 2005) short fiction has appeared in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Apex, Interfictions, Pseudopod and Clockwork Phoenix. He guest-edited Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet #33, an ecologically-themed issue that came out this July 2015. He narrates occasionally for the Beneath Ceaseless Skies fiction podcast, operates Weightless Books with Gavin J. Grant, and blogs at mossyskull.com.~

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